Stuff (Hoarding)

Let’s Stop Calling It Hoarding!

Struggles coping with stuff are due to a complex interplay of creativity and executive functioning differences that can be beneficial in other areas but can make it challenging to cope with the sheer quantity of tangible items we use in modern life–a quantity that even the most organized among us can struggle to cope with.

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Why we need to stop calling it hoarding.  

We wanted to devote a section of the website to helping people who struggle with stuff–but we couldn’t find an appropriate title.  There is no word that identifies the problem without insulting the people involved. 

Calling someone a hoarder has a similar insult level as calling someone a “ritard.” So if you would find it offensive if someone called you the second term, or if you, like me, are careful to use the phrase “person with intellectual disability,” then why would we continue to use the pejorative term hoarder to describe people with a set of executive functioning differences that lead to a problem with stuff? 

Besides being offensive, slapping a “hoarder” label on a situation prevents the flexible thinking necessary to improve the situation.  Struggles coping with stuff are due to a complex interplay of creativity and executive functioning differences that can be beneficial in other areas but can make it challenging to cope with the sheer quantity of tangible items we use in modern life–a quantity that even the most organized among us can struggle to cope with.  

Our goal for telling our story is to move people to tackle their own situation from a perspective of understanding and goals rather than shame.  These articles will come out gradually because they are more complicated to write; we’re trying to forge new paths and explain the systems Robin developed that worked for our situation and for a number of her patients.

Explore A New Way of Looking At Stuff


Stuff Struggles (Hoarding) in Numbers


1/50-1/20

prevalence of people who struggle with stuff

78%

people who struggle with stuff who have another diagnosis

50%

genetic contribution

70%

response to appropriate treatment

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